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Pierre Beaulieu, s/o Jean Hudon-dit-Beaulieu and Francoise Durand, b.1648 Notre Dame de Chemille, Angers FRA, d.April 24, 1710 Riviere Ouelle, Kamouraska Co., Quebec, m.July 13, 1676 at Ville de Quebec, Quebec to Marie Gobeil (d/o Jean Gobeil and Jeanne Guiet, b.1659 at St. Andre Niort, Poitiers, Poitou FRA, d.November 23, 1736 at Riviere Ouelle, Kamouraska Co., Quebec). Their children were as follows:

1-Marie Beaulieu, b.Aft. July 1676 RO:

2-Marie Gertrude Beaulieu, b.May 20, 1677 RO, m.Jul.04, 1697 RO to Pierre Fortin (he b.May 21, 1669, at Beaupre, Montmorency Co., Quebec, d.L'Islet, L'Islet Co., Quebec CAN. Follow the link to view this family.

3-Pierre Beaulieu, b.May 11, 1679 RO, m.Aug.01, 1707 SP to Marie Claire Paradis. Follow the link to view this family.

4-Jeanne Catherine Marguerite Beaulieu, b.May 04, 1681 RO, d.January 24, 1754 RO, m.June 06, 1701 RO to Guillaume Paradis (he b.April 04, 1677 St. Famille, Isle d'Orleans, Quebec, d.Bef. September 02, 1726 at Kamouraska, Kamouraska Co., Quebec). Follow the link to view this family.

5-Joseph Beaulieu, b.Apr.21, 1685 RO, m.Jul.28, 1711 to Geneveive Gamache. Follow the link to view this family.

6-Jean Baptiste Beaulieu, b.abt.Apr.1687 RO, d.May 04, 1754, m.Jan.09, 1712/13 RO to Marie Angelique Gagnon (she b.abt.1689 RDL, d.Nov. 10, 1762). Follow the link to view this individual.

7-Francois Beaulieu, b.April 05, 1689 RO, d.Aft1740, m.1st March 23, 1719 to Geneveive Paradis (she b.October 14, 1700, d.October 08, 1728, d/o Pierre Paradis and Jeanne Milloir) - no known children. Francois Beaulieu m.2nd February 05, 1722 at St. Anne de la Pocatiere to Angelique Emond (she b.August 25, 1695 RO, d/o Pierre Emond and Marie Agnes Grondin). Follow the link to view this family.

8-Nicolas Beaulieu, b.May 25, 1691 RO, m.Nov. 27, 1713 RO to Mary Magdelene Bouchard. Follow the link to view this family.

9-Jean Bernard Beaulieu, b.abt.Jan.1693/94 RO, d.Nov. 17, 1758 RO, m.Jun.13, 1718 RO to Marie Charlotte Gagnon. Follow the link to view this family.

10-Marie Francoise Beaulieu, b.March 26, 1696 RO, d.RO, m.Apr.25, 1718 RO to Jean Paradis. Follow the link to view this family.

11-Louis Charles Beaulieu (our direct line ancestor), b.Dec.04, 1696 RO, d.Apr.25, 1751 RO, m.Aug.30, 1723 RO to Geneveive Angelique Levesque (she b.abt.1711, d.abt.1770 RO). Follow the link to view this family.

12-Alexis Beaulieu, b.abt.Aug.1700 RO, d.Apr.1720 RO. Follow the link to view this family.

Notes for Pierre Beaulieu, s/o Jean Hudon-dit-Beaulieu and Francoise Durand:

Album Historique et Paroissial de Notre-Dame-du-Portage, 1723-1940, by Edm. Pelletier
Dictionnaire Genealogique des Familles Canadiennes, by Cyprien Tanguay: vol. 1, pg. 312
Your Ancient Canadian Family Ties by Reginald L. Olivier: pg. 165
Dictionnaire Genealogique des Familles du Quebec by Rene Jette: pg. 578

French Canadian History and Genealogy, site address: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/lwjones/french-c.htm
Pierre Hudon dit Beaulieu was born in Angers, Anjou, France circa 1647. He married Marie Gobeil in 1676. The Hudon genealogy page is about 232K and 3965 people, last updated August 20, 1998.

Pierre Beaulieu arrived in Canada on August 17, 1665, a soldier in the Compagnie de Grandfontaine of the Regimen de Carignan
1666 Census of Ville de Quebec: Pierre Beaulieu, age 18
1681 Census of Riviere-Ouelle: Pierre Beaulieu, age 32
He may have been a baker by trade

Information from Dr. Roger Beaulieu at RogerRfb@aol.com on June 17, 2001. He gives his lineage as Pierre Hudon dit Beaulieu, Pierre Beaulieu, Jean-Bernard Beaulieu, Francois Beaulieu, Marcel Beaulieu, Simon Beaulieu, Ubald Beaulieu, and himself, Roger F. Beaulieu.

Pierre Hudon dit Beaulieu (1648 - 1710) (http://marchif.crosswinds.net/texte/16/16133.html): He was born about 1648 in the parish Our-Lady of Chemillé de Cholet, Angers, the Maine-and-Loire, France. He immigrated to New France August 17, 1665, and in 1666 was living in Quebec, Quebec, Canada, where he was a baker. He was soldier of the company of Grandfontaine to the regiment of Carignan. He was a farmer. The marriage contract of Pierre Hudon says Beaulieu and Marie Gobeil was signed on July 12, 1676 by Sieur Pierre Duquet of Chenaye (daughter of Jean Gobeil and Jeanne Guyet), and on July 13, 1676, at the parish of Our-Lady of Quebec, Pierre and Marie wed. Pierre died on April 24, 1710, at River-Ouelle, Quebec, age 63 years. He was buried on April 25, 1710, at the parish Our-Lady-of-Jubilation at River-Ouelle.

Ships to America (http://www.geocities.com/genwhiz/ships.html): Pierre Hudon dit Beaulieu, on troop ship L'Aigle D'Or (with Carnigan Regiment) from LaRochelle to Quebec, August 17, 1665.

List compiled by Marcel Fournier, coordinator for Fichier Origine, and put on the Web by Denis Beauregard, Webmaster, for Fédération québécoise des sociétés de généalogie and Fédération française de généalogie (http://www.genealogie.com/cgi-bin/fo/afficher.cgi?20020828el1952): Fisch No. 85135: HUDON / BEAULIEU, Pierre: Born about 1648 Chemillé (St-Pierre) (Maine-et-Loire : 49092), Married, Son of François and Françoise Durand; Arrival or first appearance in a record after arrival
1664. Volontaire. Remark(s)- Catholic. Sa sur Jeanne est décédée à Chemillé (St-Pierre) le 14-08-1669.
Reference DGFQ, p. 578, Source of the information Jean-Marie Germe, OEDML, p. 12.

The Beaulieu Families:

Beaulieu is more of a surname than a patronym. It evokes the land and countryside, a place where the living was easy. For the Beaulieu family, like the Martins, the Lefebvres, and the Gauthiers, there are many lines of descent, no doubt because they were touched by the beauty of the countryside in New France and chose to keep their impression alive with the name they passed down to their descendants. Cyprien Tanguay lists the patronyms that, at one time or another, were coupled with this surname: Albert, Diers, Dufresne, Hudon, Lebel, Martin dit Montpellier, Palmier, Philippe de Beaulieu, and Thomas. He could have added to these the Goudreaus and other families who dropped the surname for their original patronym. The most extensive lines of the Beaulieus descend from the Martin, Hudon, and Thomas families.

Benjamin Suilte has identified Antoine Martin as a soldier and cobbler. Originally from Montpellier, in Languedoc, he was born on an unknown date, to Jean Martin and Isabelle Cost? In 1646, he was living in the region of Quebec, where his level of education and flair for business brought him to the ranks of its first settlers and administrators. His name appeared for the first time in the religious registries when he married Marie-Denyse Sevestre, daughter of Charles Sevestre and Marie Pichon. The young woman, who was 14 years old at the time, was born in France and was only about two or three when she crossed the Atlantic. Research conducted by Marielle Laroche-Montpetit reveals that the Martins dit Montpellier lived in Quebec, on the Grande-All? After 1649, they also acquired a piece of land located in Cap Rouge. In this particularly dangerous settlement, the habitants had to follow definite rules in order to survive. April 19, 1654, found them at a meeting in Fort Saint-Louis, promising to follow the orders of their commander, the cobbler Antoine Martin dit Montpellier. He was awarded the responsibility of determining fines and confiscations, authorizing arrivals and departures, and certain business transactions, by the Pinel, Blondeau, Archambault, Gauthier, Boisverdun, BOUCHER, and Mezeray families. As of May 1, 1654, the residents were obliged to abide by the law of community of interests. Antoine Martin dit Montpellier, also surnamed Beaulieu, died on May 11, 1659. He was buried that same day in the Notre-Dame de Quebec church, next to his father-in-law.

The summer had not yet come to a close and Marie-Denyse, who had brought four children into the world, was preparing to marry again. Before notary Guillaume Audouart, on July 20, she promised to marry Philippe Nepveu, the son of Pasquier Nepveu and Philippe Haudebrand, who were originally from Chartres, in the Orleans region. The young woman's second husband passed his name down to 11 children, in addition to the well-known Buttes-Neveu, in Quebec. The couple's life together was not always happy, judging by the text of the last document signed by Marie-Denyse, who disowned her husband, from whom she was, voluntarily and by mutual consent, living a separate and financially independent life.Signed on March 6, 1694, six years prior to her death, the will was contested and overruled on May 2, 1701. One line of the Martin family is related, through Marie-Denyse, to one line of the Beaulieu family, and both are related to the Neveu family. The descendants of Antoine Martin dropped the surname Montpellier.

Pierre Hudon, the ancestor of the Hudon families and one of the Beaulieu lines, was born around 1648 in Notre-Dame de Chemill?in Anjou. He was the son of Jean Hudon and Francoise Durand. This ancestor had the glory of being a member of the Carignan Regiment companies. In fact, two Beaulieus were enrolled in 1668 and, the name of baker Pierre Hudon was found on a list dated two years earlier of non-resident volunteers living in Quebec. Pierre Hudon dit Beaulieu would settle in the Bouteillerie seigneury, at Riviere-Ouelle, which he left temporarily in July 1676 to find a wife in Quebec. He was engaged to Marie, the daughter of Jean Gobeil and Jeanne Guillet, on July 12, and their wedding was celebrated the next day. Together, the couple had 11 children. In 1690, Pierre Hudon dit Beaulieu and his eldest sons played a part in the defeat of the Phips attack at Riviere-Ouelle. Pierre Hudon died in 1710, and his wife in 1736. Their numerous descendants go by the names of Hudon and Beaulieu.

A third line of the Beaulieu family put down roots in Acadia. According to Yvonne Corbeil-Beaulieu, Claude Thomas, who was baptized in Lannion, Brittany, on March 9, 1654, was the son of Martin Thomas and Francoise Hend? Second in a family of at least 12 children, he may have been a fisherman or a sailor. In 1689, he was living in Placentia, on the island of Newfoundland, where he married Madeleine Seau, daughter of Francois Seau and Marie Aubert. Madeleine Seau's mother, Marie, was the widow of Jean Diers and had another child named Pierre. Pierre Diers, writes Madame Corbeil-Beaulieu, was raised by his father-in-law and often used the name Beaulieu. His descendants would bear the name Beaulieu and lived mainly in the counties of Bellechasse and Dorchester. Because of the ongoing conflict between England and France, the children of Claude Thomas dit Beaulieu and Madeleine Seau left Acadia after the Treaty of Utrecht was signed in 1713. Pierre Diers was the first to move to Quebec, where he signed a marriage contract on December 22, 1713. Fourteen years later, in July 1727, a document certifying Marie-Anne Thomas' engagement to Georges Mabille, tells us that his parents lived in Brest, in Brittany. Two years later, in January, the double marriage of Louis and Francois Thomas dit Beaulieu to the sisters Jeanne and Madeleine Labrecque indicates that the parents had gone back to live in Quebec. On April 16, 1729, Claude Thomas dit Beaulieu died suddenly. Four of the five children born of his marriage to Madeleine Seau married, and of these four, Louis would be the only one to have children and keep the name Beaulieu. As for Madeleine Seau, she is, oddly enough, the ancestor of two branches of the Beaulieu family through her son Pierre Diers.

Information taken from (Civilizations.ca), Our Ancestors of European Origin: Genealogy and Family History, January 5, 2003 - web site http://collections.civilisations.ca/gene/indexe.html
Text by Helene-Andree Bizier

Civilizations.ca, Our Ancestors of European Origin: Genealogy and Family History, January 5, 2003 - web site http://collections.civilisations.ca/gene/indexe.html - Matrimonial History - GOBEIL, Marie, [[née et baptisée le 25 janvier 1655]] [Jean et Jeanne Guyet] acte de mariage 13 juillet 1676 Québec (contrat de mariage 12 Pierre Duquet) Pierre Hudon dit BEAULIEU
PLACE OF ORIGIN - SAINT-LIGUAIRE - Description Deux-Sèvres, arrondissement, canton et perception de Niort. Commune supprimée et fusionnée avec Niort. En Poitou, diocèse et intendance de Poitiers, parlement de Paris, élection de Niort, 153 feux.

Hudon — text by Robert Prévost, Éditions Libre Expression:

HUDON AND BEAULIEU: family names left as a legacy by a soldier of the Carignan Regiment
As is often the case in genealogy, most of Quebec's Beaulieus carry a family name which began as a nickname. They could just as easily have called themselves Martin or Hudon.

At Quebec City in 1646, the soldier Antoine Martin dit Montpellier — a nickname which identified his hometown in Languedoc — son of Jean Martin and Isabelle Côté, married Denise Sevestre, daughter of Charles Sevestre and Marie Pichon. He died prematurely in 1659, leaving four children. One of these, who is of particular interest, was also named Antoine, and founded a family in 1690 with Jeanne, daughter of Charles Cadieux de Courville and Madeleine Macard. This Antoine took the name of BEAULIEU and had three children in his first marriage, then ten more in a second marriage, contracted in 1699, with Marie Bonnet, daughter of Mélaine Bonnet and Marie Bisson. How many descendants does Antoine Martin have with the name BEAULIEU? It is hard to say, since the genealogist Tanguay cites a good thirty nicknames which are attached to the Martin family name!

Next comes Pierre Hudon dit BEAULIEU, who arrived at Quebec City on August 17, 1665, as a soldier of the Company of Grandfontaine of the Carignan Regiment. The son of Jean Hudon and Françoise Durand, he was originally from Chemillé in Anjou. The church of Notre-Dame where he was undoubtedly baptized still exists, and the fonts of the original chapel are preserved there. During the Second World War, the Germans used the church as a munitions depot, but it has since been restored to use as a church. From Angers, the N160 arrives at Chemillé to the southwest, in a little over 30 km.

At Quebec City, in July 1676, Pierre Hudon dit BEAULIEU married Marie Gobeil, daughter of Jean Gobeil and Jeanne Guyet. Some weeks later, Jean-Baptiste-François Deschamps — to whom Intendant Talon had granted the seigneury of Bouteillerie in 1672 — granted Pierre a plot of land with eight acres of frontage, by 42 acres in depth. Samuel de Champlain had given the name Houel to the river which fed this seigneury, in homage to the inspector of the salt marshes of Brouage, who had helped Champlain to attract Recollet Friars to New France. It was thus that the small village of Bouteillerie came to have the name Rivière-Ouelle: a municipality located immediately downstream from La Pocatière, where Hudon dit BEAULIEU became one of the area's pioneers.

Pierre and Marie went on to have 12 children. Astonishing for the period, not one died at birth; 11 founded households! Only one — Alexis, who was the youngest, died unmarried, at the age of 19. All of the children were born at Rivière-Ouelle. When census-takers arrived in 1681, the family included three children, cultivated 10 acres, and possessed two head of cattle.

Eleven Hudon children, as we have mentioned, married; in addition, five of these chose companions with the name Paradis! We will enumerate the marriages in their chronological order.

In 1697, Marie-Gertrude married Pierre Fortin (14 children); Catherine-Marguerite, in 1701, Guillaume Paradis (four children); Jeanne, in 1701, Guillaume Paradis (five children). It is worth noting that Catherine-Marguerite and Jeanne married on the same day, at Rivière-Ouelle, and that the two Guillaumes were cousins. To continue with the list: in 1707, Pierre married Claire Paradis, sister of one of the Guillaumes (seven children); in 1711, Joseph married Geneviève Gamache, but the union remained childless; then, in 1713, Jean-Baptiste married Marie-Angélique Gagnon (ten children). The same year, Nicolas married Marie-Madeleine Bouchard (16 children).

Two other marriages occurred in 1718: Marie-Françoise succumbed to the charms of another Paradis, named Jean-Baptiste (two children), and Jean-Bernard chose as his companion Marie-Charlotte Gagnon, the sister of Angélique (ten children). François married Geneviève Paradis around 1720 (no children) then, in 1722, he married Marie-Angélique Émond (seven children). It is Louis-Charles who closes out this series of marriages in 1723, when he chose Geneviève Lévesque as his life's companion (16 children). The genealogist Paul-Henri Hudon notes that the five Paradis sons and daughters who married into the Hudon dit BEAULIEU clan were the grandchildren of Pierre Paradis, who married Barbe Guyon in 1632 — a couple which themselves had 11 children; a chapter is devoted to this cutler from Mortagne-au-Perche in the first volume of Généalogie.

The children of Pierre and Marie contributed generously to the development of the Lower St. Lawrence region, since ten of the eleven children established themselves not just at Rivière-Ouelle, but also at Kamouraska, at La Pocatière and at Cap-Saint-Ignace. They gave the region nearly a hundred grandchildren in total.

It is likely that, in 1690, Pierre Hudon dit BEAULIEU fought against the English who, under the command of Admiral Phipps, were attempting to make landfall at Rivière-Ouelle. The Abbé Pierre de Francheville incited the settlers to take up arms in defence of the colony. According to the Annales de l'Hôtel-Dieu de Québec, Phipps lost half of the 150 men engaged in this action.

Before finishing, we should note also that Charles BEAULIEU, son of a lawyer of Bayonne, married Marie-Barbe Auger dite Baron at Montreal in 1726. The genealogist Tanguay mentions eight children born to the couple, of whom at least three died at a young age. Only one of the sons, Joseph, married.

Now to return to the family of Rivière-Ouelle: the patriarch Pierre died in 1710, no doubt surrounded by most of his children. His widow survived him by 26 years, and died an octogenarian. According to Paul-Henri Hudon, quoted above, 48 of the grandchildren were boys, and 23 of these married, perpetuating the name of Hudon dit BEAULIEU. It isn't surprising, perhaps, that a member of the Association of the Descendants of Pierre Hudon dit BEAULIEU has already listed on computer the names of nearly 7,000 individuals who bear the family name of this prolific pioneer.
Robert Prévost, Éditions Libre Expression

The Hudon and Beaulieu - text by Jacques Lacoursière - civilizations.ca
Hudon and BEAULIEU

Pierre Hudon dit (called) BEAULIEU was the son of Jean Hudon dit BEAULIEU and Françoise Durand; he was born in the late 1640s at Notre-Dame-de-Chemillé in the diocese of Anger in Anjou. In 1665, he was at Québec where, as a volunteer, he joined the Andigné company of the Carignan-Salières regiment. The following year's census records him as a baker and volunteer but not as an habitant (landholder). A few years later, he was living on a piece of land at La Bouteillerie, i.e., Rivière-Ouelle. We know little else of him until his marriage to Marie Gobeil, daughter of Jean Gobeil and Jeanne Guyet. Marie would have arrived in the colony with her parents in 1665; she came from Poitiers. The wedding took place at Québec on 13 July 1676; the couple had signed a marriage contract before notary Pierre Duquet the day before.

Exactly one year after their wedding, the couple, living at Rivière-Ouelle, had their first child; the girl, christened Marie-Gertrude, would marry Pierre Fortin at Québec in 1699. Eleven more children followed, only one of whom did not marry—this was the youngest, Alexis, possibly born in August 1690, certainly died unmarried in April 1720. Some of the boys would be known only by the name Hudon; others would be called Hudon dit BEAULIEU.

According to both René Jetté's Dictionnaire généalogique des familles du Québec and the Institut Drouin's Dictionnaire national des Canadiens-français, two of Pierre's daughters, other than Marie-Gertrude, were married at Rivière-Ouelle on the same day (6 June 1701) to the same person, Guillaume Paradis—an obvious error that will require proper research. The third daughter, Marie-Françoise, married Jean Paradis in 1718.

Pierre and François both married Paradis girls. The former was married at Québec in 1707 to Claire, daughter of Pierre Paradis and Jeanne Milloir. François was married in 1720 to Geneviève, daughter of Gabriel Paradis and Geneviève Lemieux. Pierre settled at Kamouraska. As for François, his wife died childless and he was remarried to Marie-Angélique Emond, who bore him three children. The couple lived at La Pocatière. Joseph, the fifth of the children, was married at L'Islet on 28 July 1711 to Geneviève Gamache, daughter of Nicolas Gamache and Elisabeth-Ursule Cloutier. Joseph died in mid-December of the same year and his widow was remarried two years later to Jean Gagnon. Joseph had no descendants.

On 9 January 1713, Jean-Baptiste married Marie-Angélique Gagnon, daughter of Jean. The couple settled at Rivière-Ouelle, where they had eight children. Jean-Bernard married Marie-Charlotte Gagnon, a sister-in-law, in 1718; they had seven children. Nicolas married Marie-Madeleine Bouchard in 1713 and they had eleven children, all at Rivière-Ouelle. Finally, Louis-Charles, another citizen of Rivière-Ouelle, married Geneviève Lévesque and he also had descendants.

In 1690, Pierre Hudon dit BEAULIEU had been one of the band of Rivière-Ouelle men who, led by their parish priest, had tried to keep Phips' soldiers from landing on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence. Pierre died at Rivière-Ouelle on 24 April 1710 while his widow lived until 1736.

Antoine Martin dit Montpellier, also sometimes called BEAULIEU, came from the municipality of Boussagues in the diocese of Béziers in Languedoc; his parents were Jean Martin and Isabelle Côté. On 18 June 1646, he was married in Québec City to Marie-Denyse Sevestre, daughter of Charles Sevestre and Marie Pichon. At the time, Sevestre was a clerk in the Compagnie des Habitants warehouse. At the wedding, five soldiers performed a kind of ballet, according to historian Benjamin Sulte. Six children were born of the marriage. Charles died on 11 May 1659. His widow was remarried on the following 4 August to Philippe Nepveu, who came from Chartres. This Nepveu left his name to the Butte-à-Nepveu in the Upper Town of Québec City. Some descendants of Antoine Martin and Marie-Denyse Sevestre adopted the surname BEAULIEU.

Claude Thomas was born in Brittany in 1654, the second in a family of twelve. He was probably a fisherman or sailor. In 1684, he married Madeleine Seau, from Brest, a city in Brittany. The couple lived at Plaisance (Placentia) in Newfoundland. Madeleine was the widow of Pierre Diers, by whom she had had a son named Pierre. According to genealogist Yvonne Corbeil-BEAULIEU, this Pierre Diers, who was raised by his stepfather, often used the name BEAULIEU. His descendants, also called BEAULIEU, are often to be found in Bellechasse and Dorchester Counties. Moreover, direct descendants of Claude Thomas and Madeleine Seau have also adopted the name. This indicates that there are two distinct branches of Beaulieus, both emerging from Madeleine Seau. After the treaty of Utrecht—through which the French part of Newfoundland was ceded to Britain—she and her husband spent about two years at Brest before settling in Québec City.

A certain Jean-Jérôme Le Gay dit BEAULIEU lived in Montréal in 1685. His son, bearing the same given names, signed his name as “LeGay-D. BEAULIEU”. One Pierre Lehait, who signed “Lehec de BEAULIEU”, died at Québec in 1697. Then there was a serge weaver from Bayonne named Charles BEAULIEU; he was married in March 1726 at Montréal to Marie-Barbe Auger dit Baron, daughter of Jean Auger and Charlotte Glory. The couple had eight children. Finally, a Claude de BEAULIEU was a captain of the guard of the King's farms in Canada in Québec City in 1699.

History has recorded the name of François BEAULIEU, son of Jacques BEAULIEU and an Amerindian woman of the Montagnais (Ilnu) tribe. His biography has been published in volume 10 of the Dictionary of Canadian Biography. Raised among the Native peoples of the far Northwest, he became a Yellowknife chief. Explorer John Franklin hired BEAULIEU as guide and interpreter on his second expedition to the Arctic. He settled down near the Slave River and traded with the Hudson's Bay Company. He was said to live like a sultan with his three wives and, according to historian Leslie Neatby, he was not averse to casual love affairs. In 1848, he decided to become a Catholic and was baptized by Oblate Father Alexandre-Antonin Taché, the future bishop of Saint-Boniface. He was then 77 years old. He was said to still be hunting at the age of 85, and he died at 100. His son, Etienne BEAULIEU, served as guide to the American explorer Warburton Pike. Another BEAULIEU with a talent for exploring was Olivier, one of the French Canadians who accompanied American General John Charles Frémont (born of a Québécois father) on his expeditions through the Rocky Mountains in the middle of the nineteenth century. And Jean-Baptiste BEAULIEU, who died at Lévis in 1874, was among the pioneers who made winter crossings between Québec and Lévis by steamboat.
Jacques Lacoursière Translated by Michel Thibault. Revision: Paul Don

Civilizations.ca, Our Ancestors of European Origin: Genealogy and Family History, January 5, 2003 - web site http://collections.civilisations.ca/gene/indexe.html - Matrimonial History - HUDON dit BEAULIEU, Pierre, [feu Jean et feue Françoise Durand] acte de mariage 13 juillet 1676 Québec (contrat de mariage 12 Pierre Duquet) Marie Gobeil
PLACE OF ORIGIN - CHÉMILLÉ - Description Maine-et-Loire, arrondissement de Cholet, chef-lieu de canton, perception, 1 633 (30) logements, 5 128 (3 990) habitants. En Anjou, diocèse et élection d'Angers, parlement de Paris, intendance de Tours, 275 feux.


Notes for Marie Gobeil, d/o Jean Gobeil and Jeanne Guiet:

Album Historique et Paroissial de Notre-Dame-du-Portage, 1723-1940, by Edm. Pelletier
Dictionnaire Genealogique des Familles Canadiennes, by Cyprien Tanguay: vol. 1, pg. 272
Dictionnaire Genealogique des Familles du Quebec by Rene Jette: pg. 506

French Canadian History and Genealogy, site address: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/lwjones/french-c.htm
Pierre Hudon dit Beaulieu was born in Angers, Anjou, France circa 1647. He married Marie Gobeil in 1676. The Hudon genealogy page is about 232K and 3965 people, last updated August 20, 1998.

1666 Quebec Census Index: HABITTANS DE BEAUPRÉ
Jean Gobeil .................................42 habittant
Jeanne Guyet ................................32 sa femme
Marie gobeil ................................11 fille
Francoise gobeil ............................10 fille
Marie gobeil .................................7 fille
Jeanne gobeil ................................3 fille
Et Catherine gobeil ..........................1 fille

Civilizations.ca, Our Ancestors of European Origin: Genealogy and Family History, January 5, 2003 - web site http://collections.civilisations.ca/gene/indexe.html - Matrimonial History - GOBEIL, Marie, [[née et baptisée le 25 janvier 1655]] [Jean et Jeanne Guyet] acte de mariage 13 juillet 1676 Québec (contrat de mariage 12 Pierre Duquet) Pierre Hudon dit BEAULIEU
PLACE OF ORIGIN - SAINT-LIGUAIRE - Description Deux-Sèvres, arrondissement, canton et perception de Niort. Commune supprimée et fusionnée avec Niort. En Poitou, diocèse et intendance de Poitiers, parlement de Paris, élection de Niort, 153 feux.

Hudon — text by Robert Prévost, Éditions Libre Expression:

HUDON AND BEAULIEU: family names left as a legacy by a soldier of the Carignan Regiment
As is often the case in genealogy, most of Quebec's Beaulieus carry a family name which began as a nickname. They could just as easily have called themselves Martin or Hudon.

At Quebec City in 1646, the soldier Antoine Martin dit Montpellier — a nickname which identified his hometown in Languedoc — son of Jean Martin and Isabelle Côté, married Denise Sevestre, daughter of Charles Sevestre and Marie Pichon. He died prematurely in 1659, leaving four children. One of these, who is of particular interest, was also named Antoine, and founded a family in 1690 with Jeanne, daughter of Charles Cadieux de Courville and Madeleine Macard. This Antoine took the name of BEAULIEU and had three children in his first marriage, then ten more in a second marriage, contracted in 1699, with Marie Bonnet, daughter of Mélaine Bonnet and Marie Bisson. How many descendants does Antoine Martin have with the name BEAULIEU? It is hard to say, since the genealogist Tanguay cites a good thirty nicknames which are attached to the Martin family name!

Next comes Pierre Hudon dit BEAULIEU, who arrived at Quebec City on August 17, 1665, as a soldier of the Company of Grandfontaine of the Carignan Regiment. The son of Jean Hudon and Françoise Durand, he was originally from Chemillé in Anjou. The church of Notre-Dame where he was undoubtedly baptized still exists, and the fonts of the original chapel are preserved there. During the Second World War, the Germans used the church as a munitions depot, but it has since been restored to use as a church. From Angers, the N160 arrives at Chemillé to the southwest, in a little over 30 km.

At Quebec City, in July 1676, Pierre Hudon dit BEAULIEU married Marie Gobeil, daughter of Jean Gobeil and Jeanne Guyet. Some weeks later, Jean-Baptiste-François Deschamps — to whom Intendant Talon had granted the seigneury of Bouteillerie in 1672 — granted Pierre a plot of land with eight acres of frontage, by 42 acres in depth. Samuel de Champlain had given the name Houel to the river which fed this seigneury, in homage to the inspector of the salt marshes of Brouage, who had helped Champlain to attract Recollet Friars to New France. It was thus that the small village of Bouteillerie came to have the name Rivière-Ouelle: a municipality located immediately downstream from La Pocatière, where Hudon dit BEAULIEU became one of the area's pioneers.

Pierre and Marie went on to have 12 children. Astonishing for the period, not one died at birth; 11 founded households! Only one — Alexis, who was the youngest, died unmarried, at the age of 19. All of the children were born at Rivière-Ouelle. When census-takers arrived in 1681, the family included three children, cultivated 10 acres, and possessed two head of cattle.

Eleven Hudon children, as we have mentioned, married; in addition, five of these chose companions with the name Paradis! We will enumerate the marriages in their chronological order.

In 1697, Marie-Gertrude married Pierre Fortin (14 children); Catherine-Marguerite, in 1701, Guillaume Paradis (four children); Jeanne, in 1701, Guillaume Paradis (five children). It is worth noting that Catherine-Marguerite and Jeanne married on the same day, at Rivière-Ouelle, and that the two Guillaumes were cousins. To continue with the list: in 1707, Pierre married Claire Paradis, sister of one of the Guillaumes (seven children); in 1711, Joseph married Geneviève Gamache, but the union remained childless; then, in 1713, Jean-Baptiste married Marie-Angélique Gagnon (ten children). The same year, Nicolas married Marie-Madeleine Bouchard (16 children).

Two other marriages occurred in 1718: Marie-Françoise succumbed to the charms of another Paradis, named Jean-Baptiste (two children), and Jean-Bernard chose as his companion Marie-Charlotte Gagnon, the sister of Angélique (ten children). François married Geneviève Paradis around 1720 (no children) then, in 1722, he married Marie-Angélique Émond (seven children). It is Louis-Charles who closes out this series of marriages in 1723, when he chose Geneviève Lévesque as his life's companion (16 children). The genealogist Paul-Henri Hudon notes that the five Paradis sons and daughters who married into the Hudon dit BEAULIEU clan were the grandchildren of Pierre Paradis, who married Barbe Guyon in 1632 — a couple which themselves had 11 children; a chapter is devoted to this cutler from Mortagne-au-Perche in the first volume of Généalogie.

The children of Pierre and Marie contributed generously to the development of the Lower St. Lawrence region, since ten of the eleven children established themselves not just at Rivière-Ouelle, but also at Kamouraska, at La Pocatière and at Cap-Saint-Ignace. They gave the region nearly a hundred grandchildren in total.

It is likely that, in 1690, Pierre Hudon dit BEAULIEU fought against the English who, under the command of Admiral Phipps, were attempting to make landfall at Rivière-Ouelle. The Abbé Pierre de Francheville incited the settlers to take up arms in defence of the colony. According to the Annales de l'Hôtel-Dieu de Québec, Phipps lost half of the 150 men engaged in this action.

Before finishing, we should note also that Charles BEAULIEU, son of a lawyer of Bayonne, married Marie-Barbe Auger dite Baron at Montreal in 1726. The genealogist Tanguay mentions eight children born to the couple, of whom at least three died at a young age. Only one of the sons, Joseph, married.

Now to return to the family of Rivière-Ouelle: the patriarch Pierre died in 1710, no doubt surrounded by most of his children. His widow survived him by 26 years, and died an octogenarian. According to Paul-Henri Hudon, quoted above, 48 of the grandchildren were boys, and 23 of these married, perpetuating the name of Hudon dit BEAULIEU. It isn't surprising, perhaps, that a member of the Association of the Descendants of Pierre Hudon dit BEAULIEU has already listed on computer the names of nearly 7,000 individuals who bear the family name of this prolific pioneer.
Robert Prévost, Éditions Libre Expression

The Hudon and Beaulieu - text by Jacques Lacoursière - civilizations.ca
Hudon and BEAULIEU
Pierre Hudon dit (called) BEAULIEU was the son of Jean Hudon dit BEAULIEU and Françoise Durand; he was born in the late 1640s at Notre-Dame-de-Chemillé in the diocese of Anger in Anjou. In 1665, he was at Québec where, as a volunteer, he joined the Andigné company of the Carignan-Salières regiment. The following year's census records him as a baker and volunteer but not as an habitant (landholder). A few years later, he was living on a piece of land at La Bouteillerie, i.e., Rivière-Ouelle. We know little else of him until his marriage to Marie Gobeil, daughter of Jean Gobeil and Jeanne Guyet. Marie would have arrived in the colony with her parents in 1665; she came from Poitiers. The wedding took place at Québec on 13 July 1676; the couple had signed a marriage contract before notary Pierre Duquet the day before.

Exactly one year after their wedding, the couple, living at Rivière-Ouelle, had their first child; the girl, christened Marie-Gertrude, would marry Pierre Fortin at Québec in 1699. Eleven more children followed, only one of whom did not marry—this was the youngest, Alexis, possibly born in August 1690, certainly died unmarried in April 1720. Some of the boys would be known only by the name Hudon; others would be called Hudon dit BEAULIEU.

According to both René Jetté's Dictionnaire généalogique des familles du Québec and the Institut Drouin's Dictionnaire national des Canadiens-français, two of Pierre's daughters, other than Marie-Gertrude, were married at Rivière-Ouelle on the same day (6 June 1701) to the same person, Guillaume Paradis—an obvious error that will require proper research. The third daughter, Marie-Françoise, married Jean Paradis in 1718.

Pierre and François both married Paradis girls. The former was married at Québec in 1707 to Claire, daughter of Pierre Paradis and Jeanne Milloir. François was married in 1720 to Geneviève, daughter of Gabriel Paradis and Geneviève Lemieux. Pierre settled at Kamouraska. As for François, his wife died childless and he was remarried to Marie-Angélique Emond, who bore him three children. The couple lived at La Pocatière. Joseph, the fifth of the children, was married at L'Islet on 28 July 1711 to Geneviève Gamache, daughter of Nicolas Gamache and Elisabeth-Ursule Cloutier. Joseph died in mid-December of the same year and his widow was remarried two years later to Jean Gagnon. Joseph had no descendants.

On 9 January 1713, Jean-Baptiste married Marie-Angélique Gagnon, daughter of Jean. The couple settled at Rivière-Ouelle, where they had eight children. Jean-Bernard married Marie-Charlotte Gagnon, a sister-in-law, in 1718; they had seven children. Nicolas married Marie-Madeleine Bouchard in 1713 and they had eleven children, all at Rivière-Ouelle. Finally, Louis-Charles, another citizen of Rivière-Ouelle, married Geneviève Lévesque and he also had descendants.

In 1690, Pierre Hudon dit BEAULIEU had been one of the band of Rivière-Ouelle men who, led by their parish priest, had tried to keep Phips' soldiers from landing on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence. Pierre died at Rivière-Ouelle on 24 April 1710 while his widow lived until 1736.

Antoine Martin dit Montpellier, also sometimes called BEAULIEU, came from the municipality of Boussagues in the diocese of Béziers in Languedoc; his parents were Jean Martin and Isabelle Côté. On 18 June 1646, he was married in Québec City to Marie-Denyse Sevestre, daughter of Charles Sevestre and Marie Pichon. At the time, Sevestre was a clerk in the Compagnie des Habitants warehouse. At the wedding, five soldiers performed a kind of ballet, according to historian Benjamin Sulte. Six children were born of the marriage. Charles died on 11 May 1659. His widow was remarried on the following 4 August to Philippe Nepveu, who came from Chartres. This Nepveu left his name to the Butte-à-Nepveu in the Upper Town of Québec City. Some descendants of Antoine Martin and Marie-Denyse Sevestre adopted the surname BEAULIEU.

Claude Thomas was born in Brittany in 1654, the second in a family of twelve. He was probably a fisherman or sailor. In 1684, he married Madeleine Seau, from Brest, a city in Brittany. The couple lived at Plaisance (Placentia) in Newfoundland. Madeleine was the widow of Pierre Diers, by whom she had had a son named Pierre. According to genealogist Yvonne Corbeil-BEAULIEU, this Pierre Diers, who was raised by his stepfather, often used the name BEAULIEU. His descendants, also called BEAULIEU, are often to be found in Bellechasse and Dorchester Counties. Moreover, direct descendants of Claude Thomas and Madeleine Seau have also adopted the name. This indicates that there are two distinct branches of Beaulieus, both emerging from Madeleine Seau. After the treaty of Utrecht—through which the French part of Newfoundland was ceded to Britain—she and her husband spent about two years at Brest before settling in Québec City.

A certain Jean-Jérôme Le Gay dit BEAULIEU lived in Montréal in 1685. His son, bearing the same given names, signed his name as “LeGay-D. BEAULIEU”. One Pierre Lehait, who signed “Lehec de BEAULIEU”, died at Québec in 1697. Then there was a serge weaver from Bayonne named Charles BEAULIEU; he was married in March 1726 at Montréal to Marie-Barbe Auger dit Baron, daughter of Jean Auger and Charlotte Glory. The couple had eight children. Finally, a Claude de BEAULIEU was a captain of the guard of the King's farms in Canada in Québec City in 1699.

History has recorded the name of François BEAULIEU, son of Jacques BEAULIEU and an Amerindian woman of the Montagnais (Ilnu) tribe. His biography has been published in volume 10 of the Dictionary of Canadian Biography. Raised among the Native peoples of the far Northwest, he became a Yellowknife chief. Explorer John Franklin hired BEAULIEU as guide and interpreter on his second expedition to the Arctic. He settled down near the Slave River and traded with the Hudson's Bay Company. He was said to live like a sultan with his three wives and, according to historian Leslie Neatby, he was not averse to casual love affairs. In 1848, he decided to become a Catholic and was baptized by Oblate Father Alexandre-Antonin Taché, the future bishop of Saint-Boniface. He was then 77 years old. He was said to still be hunting at the age of 85, and he died at 100. His son, Etienne BEAULIEU, served as guide to the American explorer Warburton Pike. Another BEAULIEU with a talent for exploring was Olivier, one of the French Canadians who accompanied American General John Charles Frémont (born of a Québécois father) on his expeditions through the Rocky Mountains in the middle of the nineteenth century. And Jean-Baptiste BEAULIEU, who died at Lévis in 1874, was among the pioneers who made winter crossings between Québec and Lévis by steamboat.

Jacques Lacoursière Translated by Michel Thibault. Revision: Paul Don.

Marie Gobeil originated from SAINT-LIGUAIRE, France.
According to Marcel Fournier, Niort, ville d'origine de la famille Gobeil (http://planete.qc.ca/histoire/villages/villages-141997-24037.html).


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